1/2016

Better laser treatment for cancer and skin disease patients

The three-year project of TUT’s Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) and the French FiDiPro professor Serge Mordon combines laser technology and its medical applications.

Serge Mordon

 

“Finland is a little giant in medical technology,” Serge Mordon says.

 

The FiDiPro project leader, biophysicist Serge Mordon is a world-renowned expert in the medical application of laser. ORC, in turn, is known for its innovative laser technology development, the yellow-orange laser as its latest achievement.

“In this project, I also work in cooperation with a few businesses in the field as well as local physicians,” Mordon says.

The project is funded by Tekes, the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation. The goal is to develop new medical lasers based on ORC technology. Two main medical applications were identified: cancer where a technique called ‘Photodynamic Therapy’ is now proposed for treating specific kinds of skin tumours, such as actinic keratosis, as well as local cancerous tumours related to prostatic and breast cancers, and skin lesions such as port wine stain (a specific angiodysplasia), psoriasis or vitiligo, where lasers are already widely used.

Clinical tests to be initiated with new equipment

“The latter part of the research project involves the development of ORC’s yellow-orange semiconductor disc laser (VECSEL) into a device that can be applied in skin disease treatment, not only enabling increased treatment efficiency but also reducing the costs and facilitating the use.”

The treatment will become accessible to an increasing number of patients.

 

The properties of the prospective device, the wavelength, the length of the light pulse, the size of the ray and the radiated power will be optimized for skin disease treatment. Up until now, a large and clumsy device with high maintenance costs has been used for medical purposes. The new device will require no maintenance, and the physicians will be able to carry it with them. This means that the treatment will become accessible to an increasing number of patients.

“The yellow-orange wavelength of the device enables the treatment of skin damages and skin diseases, such as port-wine stains, acne rosacea and dilated blood vessels. Preparations for clinical tests will be initiated once the prototype is completed, and implementation is planned for end of 2016.”

Mordon lives and works in Lille, France. The research group he leads at the French Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) develops non-invasive treatments based on medical imaging and laser applications (www.onco-thai.fr). Furthermore, he leads a centre at a university hospital that focuses on the use of light in medicine.

Mordon started working for TUT in January 2015. He is widely networked on an international scale and he holds a clear perception of Finland.

“Finland is a little giant in medical technology,” he remarks.

Serge Mordon

 

 

 

Who? Serge Mordon, 56 years

  • FiDiPro Professor at the TUT Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) 2015–2017
  • Research Director at the French Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Director of the Photomedicine Center at the Lille University Hospital
  • Education: PhD in Medical Physics, University of Lille, France, 1985.
  • Research interests: The medical applications of laser, nowadays focal laser ablation and photodynamic therapy in particular, previously also the applications of laser in dermatology and plastic surgery.
  • Family: Married to Gwenaelle, 3 daughters.
  • Hobbies: Music (“Tampere has a wonderful Philharmonic Orchestra”), reading and strategy (he completed a Master’s Degree in Strategy and Organization Management at the University of Paris X in 2012).
 

Text: Kati Vastamäki
Photos: INSERM 

 
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