1/2013

TUT coordinates three
Marie Curie Initial Training Networks

The networks focus on positioning technologies, financial risks and robotics.

"The primary objective of the Initial Training Networks (ITN) is to provide training opportunities for early-stage researchers. New knowledge is generated into the bargain," says Professor Jari Nurmi, who is heading one of the networks coordinated by Tampere University of Technology.

The budget of the three ITN projects totals some 12 million euros, of which TUT receives 3.2 million. The networks employ over 40 doctoral students or post docs all around Europe. Nine of them are directly employed by TUT.

TUT is the only Finnish university that coordinates three EU-funded Marie Curie Initial Training Networks. This is a considerable achievement, as the success rate of project proposals is low. Approximately 10 per cent of all applications are accepted.

Making research careers more attractive

The purpose of Marie Curie ITN projects is to increase the attractiveness of research careers among young people and promote international cooperation.

The doctoral students involved in the projects complete internships in foreign universities or companies to gain international exposure and build professional contacts.

 

Positioning technology, financial risks and robotics

Professor Jari Nurmi is leading the MULTI-POS project that explores future positioning technologies and their applications. In addition to TUT, the network involves 10 partners, such as Chalmers University of Technology, the University of Nottingham and several companies.

Standing at the interface of financial engineering and high-performance computing, the HPCFinance project develops robust volatility and interest rate models for pricing derivatives and managing financial risks. The network consists of several European universities, international banks and investment and technology companies. The project is overseen by Professor Juho Kanniainen.

The PURESAFE project has set its sights on developing autonomous service robots intended for complex and hazardous environments, such as nuclear power plants and scientific infrastructures. One of the key objectives is to slash the life-cycle costs of a given work-site operation scenario by involving a fleet of autonomous robots. PURESAFE is headed by Professor Jouni Mattila. 


 

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Tampere University of Technology is at the leading edge of technology development and a sought-after collaboration partner among the scientific and business communities. The University produces competent graduates who enter careers in the different sectors of society.

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