News and events - Tampere University of Technology

Students design public spaces to stimulate community spirit in Hervanta

Students at Tampere University of Technology (TUT) are designing socially inclusive shared spaces under the supervision of Dr. Klaske Havik from Delft University of Technology. She has taken up a year-long guest professorship in Architecture & Public Building at TUT.
Dr. Havik is known for her research on architecture, urban design and the methods to study the use, experience and imagination of places. Photo: Tuuli Laukkanen.
Dr. Havik is known for her research on architecture, urban design and the methods to study the use, experience and imagination of places. Photo: Tuuli Laukkanen.

Havik offers a course titled ‘Common Place: Public Space and Public Buildings in Hervannan Portti’ in the School of Architecture at TUT. In contemporary urban life, the traditional boundaries between public, private and collective spaces are becoming blurred as a result of different forms of ownership, issues of security, and new modes of working and living. The course challenges students to re-think these concepts by introducing the notion of ‘the commons’ both in terms of physical public spaces and buildings – such as libraries and theatres – and shared spatial practices, habits and rituals.

“We’re exploring the differences between public, private and collective spaces and the incorporation of empathy within architectural designs. The goal is to design shared spaces that bring people together both indoors and outdoors and add vibrancy and liveliness to the urban environment,” Professor Havik says.

WHO?

Dr. Klaske Havik

  • Associate Professor of Methods & Analysis in the Faculty of Architecture at TU Delft since 2013, Assistant Professor of Public Building at TU Delft in 2004-2013.
  • Guest Professor of Architecture & Public Building in the School of Architecture at Tampere University of Technology from August 2015 to August 2016.
  • Writer and editor for architecture journals OASE (2006-present) and de Architect (2000-2002). Regular articles in MAJA Estonian Architectural Review, ARK Finnish Architectural review, and other architecture and literature magazines in the Netherlands and Belgium.
  • Obtained a PhD in architecture from TU Delft in 2012.
  • Havik’s book ‘Urban Literacy. Reading and Writing Architecture’ (nai010, 2014) developed a literary approach to architecture and urban regeneration.

The course combines theory with the design of an architectural intervention in Hervanta, the largest residential area in Tampere and home to some 22,000 people. The site of investigation is the ‘Gate to Hervanta’, the area lining the Hervannan valtaväylä street at the northern edge of Hervanta. The students’ designs will accommodate topical issues, such as the ongoing processes to urbanise Hervanta and build a tram system in Tampere.

The socially inclusive approach to the built environment dates back to the 1960s and 1970s but is now gaining ground in a slightly altered form.   

“This approach is not about building icons or making big statements but offering people the opportunity to claim public spaces as their own”, Havik says.

Her native Netherlands has a long history of architecture that promotes community spirit and facilitates interaction. One of the main proponents of this movement dubbed ‘Dutch Structuralism’ is internationally acclaimed architect Herman Hertzberger, for whom a building is a framework for the life that goes on inside it.

Dr. Havik’s course brings together students from France, China, Portugal and Finland. Photo: Jenni Poutanen.

 

 

 

News submitted by: Anna Naukkarinen
Keywords: education and studies, science and research, image and communications